Professional Masters in Mining Engineering and Management

Program Description

The Professional Masters – Mining Engineering and Management (MP-MEM) is a new degree program focused on the practical application of technical, financial, management, and other linked disciplines that make up the mining industry today.  It was developed on the premise that in addition to technical capacity, future mining industry leaders will need to:

  • Identify and mitigate mining related risks and elect when to make decisions with uncertain and incomplete information.
  • Incorporate best practices and invest in new mining technologies that will bring the highest benefits.
  • Communicate, work, and lead teams to solve complex problems requiring many domains of expertise.
  • Build effective reciprocal relationships with local communities.
  • Integrate social, environmental, health, safety, security, and life-of-mine considerations into sustainable decisions for the mining industry.

As managers advance to the executive level, they must be technically competent and able to non-disruptively implement new ideas and technologies.  They also need a solid working knowledge of business, finance, management, and a host of other disciplines.  The Professional Masters – Mining Engineering and Management delivers this integrated blend of mine-related engineering and technology, mine support services, and mine-applied business and management; and will also include an independent project.  The courses will be taught by seasoned faculty from industry and academia who are experienced in day-to-day mine operations and management.

Each course will address the state of the practice, the risks and uncertainties, and the innovations and trends that will impact the mining industry in the future.  Every course will also address the use of information systems to organize and use the huge amounts of data that is generated, and how best to integrate those inextricably-linked disciplines like social and environmental responsibility, occupational and community health and safety, project security, water and waste management, internal and external communications, and life-cycle planning through closure. The online delivery allows students to stay in their current positions, with no interruption in career development, so the skills they acquire while enrolled in the program can be immediately applied to the business. Employers may even opt to supply the scope of work for their employee’s independent project, thereby getting timely solutions to real mine challenges.

The MP-MEM takes two years to complete.  Each course is delivered over an 8-week period.  Courses are taken sequentially and continuously throughout the two-year program duration.  There is no break during the Summer semester.  The independent project is done concurrently with the latter part of the program, resulting in program completion at the end of the two-year period.

Contact the Professional Masters Program

9 + 8 =

“This is a one-of-a-kind program that wraps the business and management elements into a mining engineering degree that emphasizes where the industry will be in the future instead of where it has been in the past”

Dr. Priscilla Nelson
Professor, Mining Engineering

Program Requirements

The MP-MEM is comprised of 12 courses and one independent project for a total of 33 credit hours. Students take the courses sequentially as a cohort over a two-year period. All courses are either two or three credits, with two-credit courses being 6 weeks and three-credit courses being 8 weeks in duration. Two courses are taken in series each semester throughout the year (fall, spring and summer semesters). The independent project is done concurrent with the final three courses of the program. Students must take each course in the prescribed sequence. Skipping courses or taking courses out of sequence is not allowed.

The program will build on the student’s existing mining and engineering knowledge and broaden their perspectives regarding current and future mining best practice. This will better prepare them for career advancement including roles in senior and executive management with critical financial responsibility as well as technical leadership and innovation.

Program Prerequisites

Requirements for admission into the program include:

  • A degree in some field of engineering. Admission verification will require one (1) official copy of transcripts from all universities/colleges you have attended to verify your engineering degree.
  • A Statement of Purpose letter. This letter introduces you to the Graduate Admissions Review Committee and presents your professional and personal goals and why you believe the Colorado School of Mines is the best place for you to achieve those goals.
  • Verification of mining sector experience. A letter from your current or former employer(s) verifying at least five (5) years of professional employment in the mining sector is required.
  • Letters of recommendation. Three (3) letters of recommendation from individuals knowledgeable of your academic and/or professional capabilities must be submitted directly to Mines through the online application system or by email to credentials@mines.edu.
  • Evidence of mastery of English. Results of a TOEFL (or equivalent) examination is required if English is not your native language. Please refer to the following website for details: https://www.mines.edu/graduate-admissions/international-applicants/
  • A current resumé. Your resumé should explain the nature, extent and duration of your relevant work experience in the mining sector.

Note that a Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is not required for admission into the MP-MEM program.

Program Required Curriculum

The following table identifies the three topical areas addressed by the MP-MEM and the course titles, credit hours, and learning outcome summaries within each topical area. The percentage weighting of the credit hours devoted to each topical area is also indicated.

Table 1: MP-MEM Required Curriculum and Learning Outcomes

Topical AreaCourse Title
(Credit Hours)
Learning Outcomes Summary
Mining Engineering
36% of Credits
Mine Design and Operation Planning (3)Combine mine life cycle and sustainability principles, mining fundamentals and future trends to better evaluate and optimize mine designs and mine operation plans.
Integrated Information and Mine Systems Management (3)Apply knowledge of increasing big data in mining and the increasing complexity of mine plant systems to better evaluate mining IT system designs and operations.
Geology and Mining (3)Integrate understanding of ore deposit geology, structure, resource assessment and geochemistry to better evaluate mining project designs and optimize operations.
Mineral Processing (3)Integrate knowledge of cost-efficient mineral process options matched to ore type fundamentals to better evaluate plant designs and optimize operations.
Mine Services
22% of Credits
Mine Health and Safety (2)Apply principles of providing a safe and healthy work environment including organizational culture and behavior management into everyday communications and decision making.
Mining Environmental and Social Responsibility (2)Integrate knowledge of environmental and corporate social responsibility opportunities and consequences into everyday communications and decision making.
Water Waste and Mine Closure (3)Apply knowledge of sustainable water usage, responsible waste disposal and the eventual mine closure and reclamation to decisions made in the course of mine/plant design and operations.
Mining Business and Management

36% of Credits
Mine Accounting (2)Apply mine accounting principles to evaluate accounting/financial statements, assess financial performance and other key performance indicators, and communicate effectively with accountants.
Mine Finance (2)Integrate knowledge of mine finance principles including potential sources of funding into mine project proposals as well as any mine finance obligations into operating decisions and communications.
Mineral Economics and Policy (2)Integrate knowledge of mineral economics and public policy into mining decisions, contingency planning and risk mitigation.
Project Management (3)Apply project management and leadership best practices, delivering fast low-cost results while maintaining environmental and social responsibility.
Mine Investment Evaluation (3)Apply mine investment principles and best practices to develop robust financial models for feasibility studies and project proposals.
Independent Project
6% of Credits
Independent Project (2)Demonstrate the knowledge obtained through the program with the successful completion of a relevant independent project.

The instruction of each course will incorporate the following organizational elements that cut across all courses in the program:

  • State of the current practice (strengths/weaknesses)
  • Risks and uncertainties (threats)
  • Innovations and trends (opportunities)

The following disciplines cross-cut into every course in the MP-MEM program to some level.  Students will see these reoccurring themes in every course of the MP-MEM program to a degree that is appropriate to the course being taught:

  • Project life-cycle planning and closure
  • Project management
  • Information systems and data management
  • Social and environmental responsiblity
  • Health and safety
  • Water and waste management
Program Course Descriptions

The catalog descriptions for the 12 courses and independent project follow:

MNGN 546 (2 credit hours) MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY
Responsible Faculty: Jürgen F. Brune, 303-273-3704, jbrune@mines.edu
This course focuses behaviors into a culture of safety and health consciousness is a significant management challenge, particularly in the developing world. The topics include: 1) organizational culture and behavior management, 2) strategic safety planning, 3) hazard recognition, 4) root cause analysis, 5) incident management and emergency preparedness, and 6) training programs. Learning emphasis will be balanced among fundamentals, future trends and risk depending on the specific discussion topic. The frequency of training and refresher programs throughout the project life cycle will be addressed. The importance of a health and safety culture transcending the workplace through mine employees into their families, neighbors and communities will also be discussed. This is exclusively an online course that is cohort based with limited enrollment. It is offered specifically for the Professional Masters – Mining Engineering and Management Program.

MNGN 547 (3 credit hours) GEOLOGY AND MINING
Responsible Faculty: Andrew P. Schissler, 303-273-3700, aschissl@mines.edu
This course focuses on how the ore deposit geology, structure, resource assessment and geochemistry are inextricably linked to major project decisions and cost control regarding mining methods and water management. The course emphasizes fundamentals of exploration, geo-system characterization, and the risks associated with failure to integrate these aspects into decision-making. Major topics include: 1) ore genesis, 2) exploration methods, 3) geostatistics and resource development, 4) geologic hazards, 5) geochemistry and geo-environmental considerations, 6) groundwater (further addressed in Water, Waste and Closure course), and 7) geologic factors for consideration in mine design. The importance and cost efficiency of collecting and managing data concurrent with its generation will be emphasized. This is exclusively an online course that is cohort based with limited enrollment. It is offered specifically for the Professional Masters – Mining Engineering and Management Program.

MNGN 548 (3 credit hours) INTEGRATED INFORMATION AND MINE SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT
Responsible Faculty: H. Sebnem Duzgun, 303-384-2357, duzgun@mines.edu
This course will focus on the role of information systems (IS) for specific mining systems in the mine life cycle. We will look at various data sources and acquisition methods like internet-of-things, crowdsourcing, and blockchain. Management of data is the principal function of an IS, so we will look at the main features and functions of a database management system (DBMS). Due to the exponential growth of unstructured data, the integration of structured data sets managed in a DBMS with big data infrastructures, which are mainly unstructured, and will be another focus of the course. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) will be introduced for managing spatial and tabular data. Advancements in sensor technologies allow the various remote sensing (RS) products to be integrated with GIS in various mining systems. The fundamental principles of design visualizations will also be explored. The IS in various full/semi-autonomous mining systems will be covered, and since these systems require working with different external and internal systems, we will analyze the methods of interoperability and related infrastructures as well. Finally, we will identify cybersecurity issues related to autonomous mining systems and future trends. This is exclusively an online course that is cohort based with limited enrollment. It is offered specifically for the Professional Masters – Mining Engineering and Management Program.

MNGN 551 (2 credit hours) MINE ACCOUNTING
Responsible Faculty: Paul H. Zink, 720-273-4905, pzink@mines.edu
Accounting is the process of recording past business transactions in terms of the company’s relevant currency. Financial analysis is a process of using accounting information to gain insights into a company’s financial position, performance and prospects. This course focuses on building the accounting and financial knowledge and skills to allow students to effectively participate in a company’s decision-making, financial and overall management processes. It concentrates on important management and business aspects of accounting and financial analysis. The overall objective is not to make students accountants or financial experts, but to make them better managers and leaders by developing practical knowledge and abilities to interpret financial statements, evaluate a company’s competitive position from the financial perspective, and understand the financial implications of business decisions. This is exclusively an online course that is cohort based with limited enrollment. It is offered specifically for the Professional Masters – Mining Engineering and Management Program.

MNGN 553 (3 credit hours) MINE DESIGN AND OPERATION PLANNING
Responsible Faculty: George Sturgis, 303-273-3700, gsturgis@mines.edu
This course provides an overview of mine design and operations fundamentals with a focus on the future trends which considers where the industry will be in the next decade(s). Topics give an over-arching significance to social, environmental, health and safety considerations in traditional design and operations decision-making. Principal topics will include 1) mining methods and planning, 2) production scheduling and optimization, 3) robotics and automation, 4) equipment capabilities and selection processes, 5) mine ventilation, 6) rock mechanics and ground control, and 7) waste disposal (high level, further addressed in Water, Waste and Closure course). Project life cycle and sustainability principles will be applied throughout the course content. This is exclusively an online course that is cohort based with limited enrollment. It is offered specifically for the Professional Masters – Mining Engineering and Management Program.

MNGN 554 (2 credit hours) MINE FINANCE
Responsible Faculty: Paul H. Zink, 720-273-4905, pzink@mines.edu
This course describes the finance principles applicable to the mining industry. It addresses the practical application of these principles to a level of detail appropriate for a manager or executive to understand what it takes to raise money in the international marketplace sufficient to finance a corporate entity and/or a specific mining project. Topics include: 1) multi-national, national and development bank finance, 2) project and corporate finance methods (debt/equity), 3) access to capital, 4) public offerings, 5) cash and asset management, and 6) auditing. Application of finance principles throughout the project life cycle is addressed as well as regulatory aspects, financial analysis, reporting and shareholder programs. This is exclusively an online course that is cohort based with limited enrollment. It is offered specifically for the Professional Masters – Mining Engineering and Management Program.

MNGN 555 (3 credit hours) MINE INVESTMENT EVALUATION
Responsible Faculty: Amy Jacobsen, 303-562-4250, ajacobsen@mines.edu; and Robert Cameron, 720-295-5842, rcameron@mines.edu
This course discusses the elements, methods and analyses required to evaluate the viability and robustness of a mining project. Current practices for introducing the uncertain nature of most of the important variables in an investment analysis are addressed. While future trends and risks will be covered, course emphasis will be on the fundamentals of determining the feasibility of a project and the elements contained in a robust financial model to demonstrate that feasibility. Topics include: 1) laws and security exchange expectations for publicly disclosed documents, 2) feasibility study content, 3) responsibilities of the Qualified Person, 4) capital and operating cost estimation, 5) accruals and taxes, 6) financial analysis and cash flow modeling, 7) sensitivity analysis, and 8) public reporting. This is exclusively an online course that is cohort based with limited enrollment. It is offered specifically for the Professional Masters – Mining Engineering and Management Program.

MNGN 557 (2 credit hours) MINERAL ECONOMICS AND POLICY
Responsible Faculty: Paul H. Zink, 720-273-4905, pzink@mines.edu
This course is designed to help students learn some of the basic economic principles that will help them better understand mineral commodity market behavior and the important factors that drive mineral supply, demand, prices and other market elements. The course is designed to help you build the economic, market and policy knowledge and skills to effectively participate in a company’s decision-making and strategic management discussions. It concentrates on the economic factors and principles that mine managers and executives need to recognize, analyze and deal with in order to position their company for long-term success in volatile commodity markets. The overall objective of this course is not to make students mineral economists, but to make them a better managers and leaders by developing a practical understanding of the commodity markets in which they will deal. It will also give them a deeper knowledge of government’s perspective and role in the mineral industry. This is exclusively an online course that is cohort based with limited enrollment. It is offered specifically for the Professional Masters – Mining Engineering and Management Program.

MNGN 558 (3 credit hours) MINERAL PROCESSING
Responsible Faculty: D. Erik Spiller, 303-882-2682, espiller@mines.edu
This course addresses the fundamentals for developing an appropriate and cost-efficient mineral process for a given ore type and the risks that factor into deploying the selected process. Consideration will be given for the need to demonstrate a proven and robust process to potential investors (a “bankable” process). Topics will include 1) unit operations and material handling, 2) sampling techniques specific to process considerations, 3) material testing and data organization and management, 4) water and energy considerations, 5) mill design and development (concept through construction), and 6) process waste disposal (high level, further addressed in Water, Waste and Closure course). Timing of process design within the project life cycle will be addressed. This is exclusively an online course that is cohort based with limited enrollment. It is offered specifically for the Professional Masters – Mining Engineering and Management Program.

MNGN 561 (3 credit hours) PROJECT MANAGEMENT
Responsible Faculty: Robin Bullock, 303-273-3074, rbullock@mines.edu
This course addresses the many aspects of business and project management. As the business environment changes, mine managers and executives face competing pressures to deliver both profits and effective social, environmental and economic results. Leadership is a fundamental tool for the effective executive. While a solid base of technical and operational skills is required, they must also engage a workforce, build and retain employees and seize opportunities for growth and development. While the course will address future trends and risks, emphasis will be on the fundamentals of effective business and project management. Topics include: 1) leadership, 2) project planning and controls, 3) quality assurance, 4) business process improvement, 5) risk assessment techniques, 6) personnel management and 7) conflict resolution. Because the leadership role is one that goes beyond the workplace, the course will explore the project manager’s role in communications and supporting sustainable investments. This is exclusively an online course that is cohort based with limited enrollment. It is offered specifically for the Professional Masters – Mining Engineering and Management Program.

MNGN 562 (2 credit hours) MINING ENVIRONMENTAL AND SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY
Responsible Faculty: Barbara A. Filas, 303-941-9140, bfilas@mines.edu
This course explores the fundamentals of, and to the extent relevant, the future trends in building environmentally and socially responsible mining projects in the context of the project life cycle. Emphasis will be on 1) host country and international industry regulatory expectations and good practice; 2) communication strategies, stakeholder engagement, and building community support; 3) mining project screening and scoping, 4) characterization of environmental and social media; 5) predicting project-induced environmental and social impacts and identifying plausible mitigating actions to reduce adverse impacts to acceptable levels and enhance project benefits; and 6) developing and implementing effective social and environmental management systems. Course emphasis will be on executing these fundamentals adequately and in a culturally appropriate manner, and on the risk to project continuity and corporate reputation if these fundamentals are mishandled. This is exclusively an online course that is cohort based with limited enrollment. It is offered specifically for the Professional Masters – Mining Engineering and Management Program.

MNGN 563 (3 credit hours) WATER WASTE AND MINE CLOSURE
Responsible Faculty: Dirk J.A. van Zyl, 775-560-7449, dvanzyl@mines.edu; and Michael Gabora, 303-809-4412, mgabora@mines.edu
This course addresses three disciplines that are critically important to a successful and sustainable mining project. Beyond the ore deposit, water is essential for all mining projects. Supplies must be balanced among local and regional water users. Mining and processing waste typically require large storage areas for their disposal and often have the potential to adversely impact receiving surface water and groundwater resources. Closure and reclamation is one phase of the mine life cycle and constitutes a significant mitigating action and cost to mining projects. The course will address fundamentals and future trends, but significant emphasis will be placed on the environmental, social, and cost control risks. Topics covered include: 1) water supply, disposal and treatment, 2) site-wide water management, 3) mine waste rock management, 4) process waste and tailings management, 5) solid, hazardous and medical waste minimization, recycling and disposal, 6) closure design (conceptual to construction-ready), 7) surety estimation and available surety instruments, and 8) post-closure elements including monitoring, maintenance, retrenchment, close-out costs and surety release. The importance of effective water and waste management practices, as well as integrating closure planning techniques into engineering designs, will be stressed throughout the project life cycle. This is exclusively an online course that is cohort based with limited enrollment. It is offered specifically for the Professional Masters – Mining Engineering and Management Program.

MNGN 599 (2 credit hours) INDEPENDENT PROJECT
Responsible Faculty: Robert Reeves, 303-810-9062, robertreeves@mines.edu
This course provides the student that opportunity to apply the skills and knowledge gained from the MP-MEM courses to a real-world project in the mining industry. The student and instructor collaborate on the scope of the project, and when approved, work can commence starting during the final three courses in the program. Successful projects will focus on solving problems relevant to the student’s work responsibility or to the greater mining industry. A practical yet structured approach will be taken to identify a need, propose tasks to address the need, and allocate resources to provide a solution. The student’s work product will be presented in a formal report for approval by corporate management.

FAQs
  1. Is the MP-MEM Program fully accredited now?
    The degree and courses were approved by the University and the Mines’ Board of Trustees in February 2017. Mines, however, experienced an unexpected delay in receiving approval to offer online degrees from our regional accrediting body, the Higher Learning Commission (HLC). It was not the MP-MEM Program that required action, it was the online mode of delivery that required approval. The approval for distance education courses and programs was received on June 22, 2020.
  2. What do you mean by the MP-MEM being a cohort-driven Program?
    According to yourdictionary.com, a cohort is “a group of people who have come together in support of a common cause, or a group of people who share a common characteristic.” For the MP-MEM, when students are accepted into the Program, they comprise a cohort, or group, who will take the entire sequence of courses together over the next two years.
  3. When can I start the MP-MEM Program?
    The MP-MEM Program will launch cohorts at the beginning of the Fall and Spring semesters starting in August 2020 according to the Mines academic calendar (https://catalog.mines.edu/calendar/). Cohorts will continue to launch each Fall and Spring going forward according to student demand.
  4. What documentation do I need to include to support my application for admission into the MP-MEM Program?
    You will need to provide:
    1. One (1) official copy of transcripts from all universities/colleges you have attended to verify your engineering degree;
    2. A Statement of Purpose letter that introduces you to the Graduate Admissions Review Committee and presents your professional and personal goals and why you believe the Colorado School of Mines is the best place for you to achieve those goals;
    3. A letter from your current and/or former employer(s) verifying at least five (5) years of professional employment in the mining sector;
    4. Three (3) letters of recommendation from sources knowledgeable of your academic and professional capabilities which are submitted directly to Mines through the online application system or by email to credentials@mines.edu;
    5. Results of a TOEFL examination (or equivalent) if English is not your native language; and
    6. A current resumé explaining the nature, extent and duration of your relevant work experience in the mining sector.
  5. Is a Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) required for admission into the Program?
    No. The full admission requirements are identified in the preceding question.
  6. Once admitted into the MP-MEM Program, can I take the required courses whenever I want to take them?
    No. When a student is accepted into the MP-MEM Program, the cohort of students will take the sequence of courses together over the two-year period. Skipping a course or taking courses out of sequence is not allowed unless specifically authorized by the MP-MEM Program Manager.
  7. How much does the Program cost?
    US$999 per credit hour. The Program requires 33 credit hours to complete the degree, so the total cost is US$32,967 over two years.
  8. Is there a premium tuition cost for out-of-state or out-of-country students?
    No. The cost is US$999 per credit hour for all students in the Program.
  9. If I am not a U.S. citizen, do I need a student visa to take this Program?
    No. All coursework can be done from your current location of residence.
  10. Will I be required to travel to the Colorado School of Mines campus or anywhere else to complete this Program?
    No. This course is delivered exclusively online and can be completed from anywhere that there is quality internet communication.
  11. When is the deadline to submit an application for admission?
    Students interested to join a cohort need to apply for admission no later than the deadlines stated on the Mines website (https://www.mines.edu/graduate-admissions/deadlines/). Because the Program is online, there is no differentiation between international and domestic students, so the MP-MEM uses the “Domestic” deadlines of July 1 for Fall enrollment and November 1 for Spring enrollment. Due to the late accreditation, there will be a one-time relaxing of the July 1 application deadline to August 1, 2020 for Fall 2020 enrollment.
  12. When does the tuition need to be paid?
    Tuition must be paid according by the dates established by the Bursar’s office (https://www.mines.edu/bursar/).
  13. Is there any financial aid available for the MP-MEM Program?
    Students in the MP-MEM Program are eligible to apply for financial aid in the same manner as our on-campus students (https://finaid.mines.edu/graduate-students/).
  14. Is there a maximum enrollment number for the Program?
    The first cohorts will be limited to 20 students. Subsequent cohorts may allow more students depending on demand but will be limited to a manageable size. The intent is to maintain cohort sizes sufficiently small as to encourage camaraderie and a relaxed and comfortable professional network among students and faculty.
  15. When will the classes be delivered?
    Two courses are delivered in each semester, one in the first session and one in the second session according to the Mines academic calendar for online programs (https://catalog.mines.edu/calendar/). All courses are either two or three credits. Three credit courses are delivered over a period of 8 contiguous weeks. Two credit courses are delivered over 6 contiguous weeks. Classes are held year-round for two years, during Fall, Spring and Summer semesters. This comprises 48 weeks of class each year. Courses will start on the Monday closest to the start date stated for on-campus classes according to the Mines academic calendar. Spring and Fall Breaks and public holidays are not observed in the MP-MEM Program.
  16. How will classes be delivered?
    The MP-MEM is a paced, asynchronously delivered program where the courses are presented in Canvas, the learning management system used by Mines. Courses are opened to students on the first day of each online semester session according to the Mines academic calendar (https://catalog.mines.edu/calendar/). Some faculty members open the entire course at the beginning of the semester session; others open the course materials for the coming week at midnight on Monday morning. Most courses require student deliverables two times each week, the deadlines for submission are usually 11:59PM on Wednesday or Thursday, and 11:59PM on Sunday (Mountain Time in Golden CO).
  17. Are there regularly scheduled times when I must attend a class?
    No. There are no regularly scheduled live lectures so students can do their work at a time that is most convenient for them. Work is mapped out at the beginning of each week so students know what they need to accomplish that week and can plan accordingly. This will include listening to lecture videos, completing reading and homework assignments, participating in chat room dialogues and interactive group activities and taking quizzes and tests. Occasionally, students will be asked to join a live lecture. The time of such synchronous lectures will be announced sufficiently early as to allow students to arrange their schedule to attend. If students are unable to attend a live lecture, the lecture is recorded so that students can access the lecture at an alternate time.
  18. Will I be able to meet with my instructor if a personal issue comes up or I need special assistance?
    Yes. All instructors hold open office hours at least twice each week via Zoom video conferencing. The instructor’s open office hours and contact information will be clearly stated at the beginning of each course. Students wishing to schedule a private meeting with the instructor may request such a meeting via email or telephone.
  19. Will there be any opportunity to meet the faculty members and other students in my cohort in person?
    Students are welcome to visit the Mines campus at any time and if you do plan a visit, you should schedule meetings with the available faculty. We do also strongly recommend (but do not require) that students and graduates of the MP-MEM Program attend the Colorado School of Mines Alumni Reception at the SME Annual Meeting & Expo (http://www.smeannualconference.com). In addition to the excellent career development and networking opportunities available from attending the SME Annual Meeting, attending the Mines Alumni Reception will allow online students and graduates to meet and network with their online counterparts as well as other Mines faculty, students and alumni.
  20. When I complete the MP-MEM Program, will I be able to participate in a graduation commencement ceremony?
    Yes. Mines will host a virtual graduation for MP-MEM students who cannot or do not wish to travel to Golden to attend an on-campus graduation ceremony. Participation in the virtual graduation most certainly does not preclude MP-MEM graduates from participating at one of our on-campus commencement ceremonies. You will simply need to make the MP-MEM Program Manager aware of your intent to participate in the on-campus graduation ceremony.
  21. Can I skip a course and take it later?
    No. The courses are designed to be taken sequentially. Only under extreme circumstances would skipping a course be allowed and only on a case-by-case basis as authorized by the MP-MEM Program Manager.
  22. Can I get credit up front for analogous courses I have already taken in a given subject?
    No. All courses in this Program have been designed specifically for this online degree and have unique cross-cutting elements in every course.
  23. If I have a scientific, but not an engineering, degree and have experience in the mining industry, will I qualify for enrollment?
    No. This is a Mining Engineering and Management degree, so you must have an engineering background to qualify for enrollment. This Program does not include basic engineering courses to bring non-engineers to the level required to obtain a degree in mining engineering.
  24. If I have an engineering degree and no experience in the mining industry, will I qualify for enrollment?
    No. Students must have a fundamental working knowledge of the mining industry. The Program will not teach students how to design a mine (this is taught in our Bachelor of Science in Mining Engineering curriculum), but rather it will review the state of the practice, examine the new technologies and trends, discuss the risks and opportunities, and integrate the various linked disciplines into the content. It will also include mine-applied business content, including management, accounting, finance, economics, and valuation.
  25. If I have a degree in civil (or other non-mining) engineering and five years (or more) experience in the mining industry, will I have the appropriate base knowledge to be successful in this Program?
    Yes. This Program is not a mine design course (that is our Bachelor of Science degree in the Mining Engineering curriculum). It is designed to give the mid-level engineer the background needed to move up to the management and executive levels in the mining sector. Not everyone who advances to the executive level of the mining industry is a mining engineer, but everyone who does advance needs to understand the state of the practice, the emerging trends, the risks and opportunities, the linked disciplines and the relevant business aspects.
  26. Will this Program be available in languages other than English?
    Not at this time. Courses are currently taught only in English so all students must be proficient in the English language.